Macleans

  • Michiko Kakutani blames yesterday’s progressive Left for t...
    It’s not every critic, even in the heyday of print media, who’s left a visible trace in popular culture. But Michiko Kakutani, 63, was the New York Times’s premier literary critic for more than three decades. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1998 and once described as “the… ... more
    Macleans10 hours ago
  • ‘Nothing short of treasonous’: Washington condemns Trump
    After U.S. President Donald Trump shocked the world by doubting his own intelligence community’s conclusions about Russian meddling in the election that brought him to power, most of Washington’s most powerful lawmakers—both Republicans and Democrats—expressed dismay at the president’s comments. Sen. John McCain, the chair of the Senate armed services… ... more
    Macleans12 hours ago
  • Trump and Putin preside over the funeral for Ronald Reagan...
    The cognitive dissonance for life-long Republicans must be intense. Right up through the 2012 election, when Barack Obama mocked Mitt Romney for what seemed to the Democrat to be an outmoded wariness about Russian intentions, the party of Nixon and Reagan held some truths to be self-evident. One of them… ... more
    Macleans13 hours ago
  • There is no precedent—a president sides with America...
    Today was arguably one of the most stunning and disgraceful moments in the history of the American presidency. Clinton had sex with an intern. Nixon covered up Watergate. Kennedy invaded Cuba. But none of them stood in front of the world and publicly sided with America’s greatest rival over his… ... more
    Macleans15 hours ago
  • Why Canada’s Supreme Court appointments are nothing like A...
    Adam Goldenberg is a trial and appellate lawyer in Toronto, an adjunct professor of law at the University of Toronto, and a former law clerk to Beverley McLachlin, the former chief justice of Canada. No country in the world does judicial appointments quite like the United States. Where else do… ... more
    Macleans16 hours ago
  • What one wedding photo tells us about Mexico’s political p...
    On July 1, Mexico voted for massive change. And Andrés Manuel López Obrador, a silver-haired, 64-year-old from southern Tabasco state, won a staggering 53 per cent of the vote – the most support for a presidential candidate since 1982, when Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) rule went unchallenged. López Obrador, commonly… ... more
    Macleans18 hours ago
  • Teachers say they’ll find a way to keep Ontario’s update...
    In 2010, after a two-year consultation process, then-premier Dalton McGuinty attempted to revamp Ontario’s health and physical education curriculum for the first time since 1998. The older version waited until Grade 8 to teach students the “consequences of engaging in sexual activities.â€� But McGuinty’s changes were met with fierce opposition… ... more
    Macleans3 days ago
  • What Trump’s impeachment might look like—and how da...
    It’s hard to get through a single day in a Donald Trump news cycle without a certain subject popping up: impeachment. The list of those calling for Trump’s premature political demise now includes Democratic lawmakers, political candidates, celebrities and at least one billionaire. This month, Walmart removed “Impeach 45â€� T-shirts… ... more
    Macleans4 days ago
  • In a load of clean clothes, a small act of faith
    It’s been a hot summer, and the world, it felt, was only getting hotter. Geopolitical crises, climate change, brazen violence, and threats to the rights of vulnerable people have levied anxiety to the average follower of news. Most recently, the Trump Administration’s policy of separating migrant children from their parents stirred outrage—like so many… ... more
    Macleans4 days ago
  • Maryam Monsef: There is no Liberal form of feminism. There i...
    The internet can be a heated and ugly space for women, and I might argue, especially for female politicians. Even so, I was surprised when last week, on Twitter, a Conservative colleague told me to “grow a pair.â€� Everyone knows what this piece of slang means: male anatomy is required… ... more
    Macleans4 days ago
  • Caught between a rock and a hard place, Toronto Police confu...
    In March of 1986, a letter arrived at RCMP headquarters in downtown Toronto. It was sent by a group calling itself the Armenian Secret Army for the Liberation of Our Homeland, and it threatened that bombs would be detonated in the Toronto subway during rush hour unless the three men… ... more
    Macleans4 days ago
  • How a small Toronto firm ended up designing the CN Tower
    In an industry obsessed with making everything bigger, brighter and bolder, WZMH Architects proves that, sometimes, small is the way to go—at least when it comes to the size of an architecture firm. With just 12 partners and 120 employees, WZMH is tiny compared to competitors with thousands of people… ... more
    Macleans4 days ago
  • All the new bad ideas that Boris Johnson will ride to power ...
    On July 9, U.K. Conservative MP Boris Johnson all but Snapchatted his departure from his post as British foreign secretary—ostensibly, his resignation letter explains, because upon consideration, he found that he could not support the deal for a soft Brexit that his party had only just hammered out in a… ... more
    Macleans4 days ago
  • The FBI agent who sent anti-Trump texts proves a fighter as ...
    WASHINGTON — Declaring an inquisition by the House of Representatives to be “just another victory notch in Putin’s beltâ€�—which assumes that Vladimir Putin actually wears a belt and does not simply command his trousers not to fall down—FBI “lover boyâ€� Peter Strzok dodged beanball after beanball Thursday at a congressional… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • What on earth is Stephen Harper up to?
    At the Lloydminster Exhibition’s Stockade Convention Centre, the stage’s black drapes are accented with a sash-like green curtain and a banner of logos for Reid Signs, Atlas Appraisal Services and title sponsor Fountain Tire. Canada’s former prime minister kicks off the night with a few jokes. There’s the one about… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • Stephen Harper’s own words: ‘I was never in the job to b...
    In mid-June, former prime minister Stephen Harper gave speeches to small chambers of commerce in Lloydminster, Sask., and Leduc, Alta. In keeping with his desire not to comment on what his successors are doing, his speech largely stuck to global political trends, trade and business opportunities. But the audiences wanted… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • A free trade fighter in the eye of Hurricane Trump
    The Canadian-American Business Council (CABC) has been around for three decades, and Scotty Greenwood—now its CEO—has been involved in one role or another for 17 of those years. For most of that time, her organization has been “Canada-famous and U.S.-obscure,” she says—the typical state of affairs given the different scales… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • NATO will endure, with or without the United States
    If you were to walk onto the Ä€daži military base in Latvia, about 25 kilometres north of Riga, and head for the mess hall, the first things you notice are the patches on everyone’s shoulders. There are plenty of maple leaves, and then a mix of flags from Spain, Italy,… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • Canada could lead world in resettling refugees by 2020, pass...
    In September 2016, for his final address to the United Nations General Assembly as president of the United States, Barack Obama said America would resettle 110,000 refugees in the coming year. It would represent not only be a substantial increase aimed at addressing the global refugee crisis, but also a… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • The Catholic Church has a sainthood problem
    There really is no business like saint business. Once you make it, people pray to you, put statues of you in their rooms, and thank you when they recover from an illness—or just find a parking spot. But the making of and praying to saints—and the entire hagiographical industry, for… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • Time for a moratorium on summits: The Trump Pause?
    Summits are meant to be useful. They require an incredible amount of effort: painstaking planning, detailed negotiations, expensive logistics and overwhelming security. And all of this is expended almost entirely in the expectation that the spectacle of the gathered leaders will convey an unequivocal message of unity or strength. The… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • Toronto police update on expanded patrols downtown
    Premier Doug Ford said the province is monitoring an unconfirmed “potential threatâ€� in the City of Toronto. This comes after Toronto police said they are “responding to an unconfirmed, uncorroborated piece of information relating to the GTA.â€� “As a result of this information, you will see an increased number of… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • Greyhound Canada’s cuts are a public safety crisis for Ind...
    When British Columbia’s Missing Women Commission of Inquiry issued its final report in 2012, the provincial government was urged to “develop and implement an enhanced public transit system to provide a safer travel option connecting Northern communities, particularly along Highway 16â€�—perhaps better known as the Highway of Tears, so named for all of… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • What Justin Trudeau had to say at the NATO summit
    At a moderated discussion held on the sidelines of the NATO summit in Brussels today, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau fielded questions on a wide range of issues related to Canada’s membership in the defence alliance—from the level of Canadian military spending, to how the European Union complements NATO, to his… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • This is why your summer might be full of mosquitoes
    Heath MacMillan is an assistant professor of biology at Carleton University. As you pack your bags for the cottage or campground this weekend, don’t forget to bring light clothes with long sleeves—and a truckload or two of insect repellent. Spring has come and gone, so welcome to mosquito season. How… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • This is Donald Trump’s world now
    You keep wondering how the world could get worse. It gets worse. Our story begins, but doesn’t end, with the president of the United States. With the benefit of hindsight, maybe the surprise is that it took 17 months for Donald Trump to give up on Canada. For the longest… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • Ontario reverting to old sex ed curriculum in fall, educatio...
    TORONTO — Ontario schools will go back to teaching the same sex-ed curriculum they did in the late 1990s this fall after the province’s new government announced Wednesday it was revoking an updated version brought in by the previous regime. Just over a week into the summer break, Education Minister… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • Canada’s housing crisis reinforces violence against poor w...
    Alexandra Collins is a research associate at the British Columbia Centre on Substance Use and PhD Candidate at Simon Fraser University. Canadian cities are in the throes of an unprecedented housing crisis. Lax housing policies and lending practices, along with a previously non-existent national housing strategy have converged, contributing to… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • The most Canadian cross-country road trip
    Christy Hawley and her boyfriend, Jeffrey Côté, had two full days of driving behind them when they pulled over in tiny Upsala, Ont., and got out of their U-Haul truck to get a closer look at a hand-painted sign as tall as Christy. It was June 28, and they were… ... more
    Macleans6 days ago
  • Tracking the Doug Ford cuts
    Originally published: July 11. Latest update: July 11 Before he was elected premier of Ontario, Doug Ford made an array of ambitious campaign promises—from middle-class income tax cuts to repealing the cap-and-trade program to scrapping the discovery math curriculum in public schools. He vowed to create a “government for the people,â€�… ... more
    Macleans6 days ago
  • Why Prince Harry and Meghan Markle went to Ireland
    Freshly married Prince Harry and his bride, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex—arguably the hottest members of Britain’s royal family right now—have completed a quick 24-hour visit to the Republic of Ireland as their first official trip as newlyweds. The destination was chosen deliberately: Government and palace officials know that they are incredibly… ... more
    Macleans6 days ago
  • America’s Supreme Court circus is in session
    A torrid sun was setting behind the Lincoln Memorial, with its naïve hope by a martyred president that the politics of the United States might be conducted “with malice toward none and charity for all,â€� when the teenager from the purple-shirted PROTECT ROE delegation stuck her megaphone right in the… ... more
    Macleans6 days ago
  • Why robber barons and the working poor are back with a venge...
    Nominated twice for the Booker Prize—and with two works of fiction, The Turning and Breath, adapted into films—Tim Winton has been one of Australia’s most internationally prominent novelists since 1991’s Cloudstreet. The grandson of a stevedore and the first member of his family to finish high school and go to… ... more
    Macleans7 days ago
  • Borders of the mind: The privilege and politics of travellin...
    Like a mighty fortification in a fantasy movie—the Gates of Mordor in Lord of the Rings, or Game of Thrones’s icy northern stockade, or the euphemistically-named Anti-Fascist Protection Rampart of more recent historical memory—Donald Trump’s wall between the United States and Mexico may not physically exist, but it looms large in the imagination. A wall, to split… ... more
    Macleans7 days ago
  • Trump trashing NATO isn’t important—what the allian...
    NATO is meeting this week and it may be one of the most important international summits since Gorbachev and Reagan met in Reykjavik 32 years ago. Summitry is a strange thing. We see these meetings as just a standard element of international diplomacy, but in truth they are anachronistic ceremonies.… ... more
    Macleans7 days ago
  • Family of a Humboldt Bronco who was killed in the crash suin...
    CALGARY – The man who was behind the wheel of the transport truck involved in the Humboldt Broncos bus crash has been released on bail. Today, we’re also learning he’s being sued. The family of the youngest player to die in the crash three months ago has filed a suit for… ... more
    Macleans7 days ago
  • Why Turkey, not Trump, is the NATO wildcard
    When NATO leaders meet in Brussels this week, all eyes will be on Donald Trump and what has become his trademark of blowing up international summits. The script is more or less written: Trump will berate the U.S.’s staunchest allies for not pitching in their fair share. He will lament… ... more
    Macleans7 days ago
  • So long, Silicon Valley. China is the world’s innovation e...
    BEIJING and SHANGHAI — You don’t have to look very far to see evidence of the startup boom in China’s capital. On nearly every main thoroughfare, hundreds of bright yellow or orange bicycles are lined up along the sidewalk, where pedestrians stop to unlock them with their smartphones. The bikes… ... more
    Macleans7 days ago
  • Truck driver charged in Humboldt Broncos crash released on $...
    MELFORT, Sask.— A transport truck driver charged in a crash that killed 16 people on the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team bus has been released on $1,000 bail. Jaskirat Sidhu, who is 29 and from Calgary, faces several conditions, including that he not drive and that he surrender his passport. READ: A tribute to… ... more
    Macleans7 days ago
  • Thai cave rescue: In celebration, a nation unites
    MAE SAI, THAILAND • When people in Thailand say goodbye, occasionally they say this: “We will come together when the nation needs us.â€� For more than two weeks, twelve of the country’s boys and one of their men have been encased in a dark mountain, hoping someone would bring… ... more
    Macleans7 days ago
  • In Ontario, Doug Ford’s rule-by-antagonism begins
    Over the past couple of years, the word “kakistocracyâ€� has gotten plenty of work within the political lexicon. The word, meaning “rule by the worst,â€� was coined in 1644 during a speech by Paul Gosnold, railing against the Roundheads who aimed to overthrow the British monarch’s rule and replace it… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Greyhound Canada to end routes in Prairies, B.C., leaving sm...
    OTTAWA — Greyhound Canada says it is ending its passenger bus and freight services in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and cancelling all but one route in B.C. — a U.S.-run service between Vancouver and Seattle. As a result, when the changes take effect at the end of October, Ontario and… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Why Donald Trump will fail to divide Canada and the U.S.
    From bullying our Prime Minister, to dredging up 200-year-old war stories, to threatening massive tariffs on Canadian exports and to tear up NAFTA, U.S. President Donald Trump has been doing his damnedest to drive a wedge between his country and ours. It won’t work. Canada and the U.S. share a… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • How being a doctor prepared Jane Philpott for politics
    There’s no more unlikely political star in Ottawa than Jane Philpott, a soft-spoken family doctor who hates trading partisan barbs with her opponents and shuns the spotlight. But she gets things done. That’s probably the best explanation for… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Meet the barber behind the Toronto Blue Jays
    Throne’s Joshua Diamante. (Photo by Paul Bolasco) Joshua Diamante is still wearing black surgical gloves. He just finished cutting a customer’s hair and has a few minutes to spare before his next appointment. Hip-hop is blaring from the speakers and Throne Barbershop’s 10 chairs are in use on this busy… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Meet the barber behind the Toronto Blue Jays
    Throne’s Joshua Diamante. (Photo by Paul Bolasco) Joshua Diamante is still wearing black surgical gloves. He just finished cutting a customer’s hair and has a few minutes to spare before his next appointment. Hip-hop is blaring from the speakers and Throne Barbershop’s 10 chairs are in use on this busy… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • After 48 hours of intrigue, Theresa May—and Brexitâ...
    On Friday, U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May went to bed having secured a victory, of sorts, on Brexit. Just 48 hours later, it seems it will be many nights until she sleeps as soundly as she did that night—unless, that is, she is put to sleep by her party. Rewind to… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • After 48 hours of intrigue, Theresa May—and Brexitâ...
    On Friday, U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May went to bed having secured a victory, of sorts, on Brexit. Just 48 hours later, it seems it will be many nights until she sleeps as soundly as she did that night—unless, that is, she is put to sleep by her party. Rewind to… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • B.C. man ‘lucky to be alive’ after grizzly attack by mot...
    VANCOUVER—A park ranger is grateful to be alive after a terrifying grizzly bear attack outside his home in Bella Coola, B.C. Jordan Carbery said he arrived home last Monday night and saw some bears in his headlights as he pulled into the driveway. His vehicle scared them off, and he… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • B.C. man ‘lucky to be alive’ after grizzly attack by mot...
    VANCOUVER—A park ranger is grateful to be alive after a terrifying grizzly bear attack outside his home in Bella Coola, B.C. Jordan Carbery said he arrived home last Monday night and saw some bears in his headlights as he pulled into the driveway. His vehicle scared them off, and he… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Thai cave rescue: Trapped coach’s community chooses love o...
    MAE SAI, THAILAND • The neighbour to the right of Ekapol Chanthawong’s house could find reasons to hate him. She could find just as many reasons to forgive him. The neighbour to his left could hate him also; equally, she could forgive. More than two weeks ago, the twenty-five-year-old assistant soccer coach… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Thai cave rescue: Trapped coach’s community chooses love o...
    MAE SAI, THAILAND • The neighbour to the right of Ekapol Chanthawong’s house could find reasons to hate him. She could find just as many reasons to forgive him. The neighbour to his left could hate him also; equally, she could forgive. More than two weeks ago, the twenty-five-year-old assistant soccer coach… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • 12 questions for Justin Trudeau about the Kokanee ‘Inciden...
    Since July 1, Justin Trudeau’s responses to media about the reported Kokanee “Incident” have raised more questions than they answered. This would be the incident dating back to 2000 in which a 28-year-old Trudeau, years from entering politics, was accused by a reporter with the Creston Valley Advance, a small… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Trudeau-Ford: The next chapter in Canada’s eternal campaig...
    We now bring you exclusive footage of yesterday’s meeting between Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Ontario not-quite-premier-yet Doug Ford: Boy, there’s a joke the young ones won’t get. Anyway. In a minute I’ll describe and interpret the extraordinary events of Thursday’s Trudeau-Ford meeting at the Ontario legislature. But let… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • In the U.S.-Canada trade war, we are not blameless
    Brian Lee Crowley is the managing director of the Macdonald-Laurier Institute. Sean Speer is a Munk senior fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute and a former senior economic adviser to Stephen Harper. A great deal of economic patriotism has come to the fore amid the theatrics of a trade war between… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • ‘Dirty money’ is destroying Vancouver’s civic fabricâ...
    It’s the opposite of an American rust-belt wasteland of shuttered factories, and it’s nothing like one of those seething immigrant banlieues of Paris. But Metro Vancouver, in its way, with its Ferraris and Lamborghinis and its glorious backdrop of the mountains and the sea, is just as much a case… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • RCMP announce charges in Humboldt Broncos bus crash—F...
    REGINA — The driver of a transport truck that collided with a bus carrying the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team is facing criminal charges. RCMP say Jaskirat Singh Sidhu, who is 29, was arrested this morning at his Calgary home and is in police custody. He faces 16 counts… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • Trump-Putin: A summit in one act
    “The fear is that Trump will conduct another slash-and-burn mission at the NATO summit, then follow it up with a warm and chatty engagement with Putin a few days later in Helsinki.” – Adm. (Retd) James G. Stavridis, former NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe HELSINKI, FINLAND, JULY 16: Donald TRUMP… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • The Ottawa Senators enter the ‘Tyson Zone’
    The sports columnist Bill Simmons coined the term “the Tyson Zoneâ€� to describe the rare celebrity whose behaviour is so unhinged that there is nothing they could do anymore that would shock or surprise anyone. Mike Tyson, of course, was the original, and the president of the United States is… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • It’s time to put horse-drawn carriages out to pasture
    Horse-drawn vehicles helped build Canada. In the 1800s, during Canada’s golden age of carriages and sleighs, they helped move goods and people further and easier than ever before. They revolutionized trade and personal transportation, requiring less skill than traveling by horseback. Horse-drawn vehicles were central to everything we did and everywhere we went, and they hold an important place in our pre-automobile history. Today, wandering… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • Forget outdated tactics: To address gun violence, let’s em...
    Owen Charters is the president and CEO of Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada. Brazen. Public. Daylight. More and more these words are showing up in news reports about gun crime. Shootings are happening on playgrounds now, and we know kids are scared. Toronto is experiencing its fourth straight year… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • Why Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez won’t change the Democratic p...
    David-and-Goliath tales are rare in politics. That’s only one reason why Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s victory over 10-term Democrat incumbent Rep. Joe Crowley in a New York district primary in June saw mainstream media reaching for smelling salts—before scrambling to publish “Who is Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez?â€� stories. Many outlets—the New York Times and… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • Canadians to Trump: Don’t mess with us
    On June 11, Martin and Carole Lajeunesse, a brother-and-sister pair of restaurateurs, were working over cups of coffee at LaLa Bistro in Buckingham, Que. It was a Monday, the only day of the week when they don’t serve breakfast in the restaurant, where the daily lunch specials are scrawled on… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • How Meghan Markle’s unofficial royal endorsement is helpin...
    For the past year, Birks Inc., a 139-year-old Montreal-based jewellery company, has found itself in the middle of a modern mercantile fairy tale with an unknown ending. It began in August 2017, when Meghan Markle, now Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, wore Maison Birks jewellery in her ï¬�rst public outing with… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • How a judge’s retirement may be putting U.S. abortion...
    Back in 1973, American women’s rights activists won a landmark reproductive rights victory in the Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade, which ruled in favour of a woman’s constitutional right to have an abortion. Forty-five years later, that win is now at stake — at least according to those who… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • Justin Trudeau is feeling beleaguered—and a NATO summ...
    Andrew MacDougall is a London-based columnist, commentator and consultant. He was formerly director of communications to Stephen Harper. Imagine you’re Justin Trudeau. A critical NATO summit lies a week distant. Donald Trump, the volatile U.S. President with whom you’re locked in an escalating war on trade, is now sending caustic letters about your defence… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • We’ve given tech companies like Twitter too much political...
    Elizabeth Dubois is an assistant professor at the University of Ottawa. Her work examines digital media, influence and political engagement. Find her on Twitter @lizdubois, or at www.elizabethdubois.ca. Politics, the old expression goes, is the art of the possible. It is also about constantly testing how far you can bend the rules of the game. Take, for… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • Canadian divers hold out hope as Thai soccer team awaits res...
    An Alberta-based explorer who was trapped in a partly flooded cave for days says her heart goes out to the members of a boys’ soccer team as they await rescue from an underground cavern in Thailand. Kathleen Graham, president of the Alberta Speleological Society, says she remembers “pure relief” washing… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • Doug Ford starts to dismantle Ontario’s cap-and-trade prog...
    TORONTO — Ontario’s new premier has taken a step in his plan to dismantle the province’s cap-and-trade system, a move some observers say leaves businesses involved in the program grappling with uncertainty. In a statement released Tuesday, Doug Ford said he has revoked the regulation that outlines the carbon pricing… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • Donald Trump’s NAFTA timetable doesn’t work for Canada
    OTTAWA — The federal Liberal government is determined to rekindle intensive talks on a new continental trade pact this summer—even though President Donald Trump says he won’t sign a renegotiated NAFTA until after the U.S. midterm elections this fall. Now that Mexico’s presidential election is done, Ottawa wants negotiations on… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
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