Macleans

  • How Dave Bidini came to know and love Canada’s North
    Like a lot of Canadians, I’d been to the “North” before, although the notion is arguable. North, to me, was a Georgian Bay cottage, a gig in Thunder Bay, maybe a literary festival somewhere above Saskatoon. “North” was even, preposterously, the highway in B.C. that runs from Prince George to Prince Rupert, although you’d have to climb… ... more
    Macleans7 hours ago
  • The spectre of bad internet laws in Europe should be a warni...
    Josh Tabish is a civic engagement and digital policy expert. He is currently a technology exchange fellow with Fight for the Future. Laura Tribe is executive director of OpenMedia, which works to keep the internet open, affordable, and surveillance-free. Last week, members of the European Parliament voted to advance new copyright regulations that… ... more
    Macleans11 hours ago
  • The myth that women are more likely to succeed at municipal ...
    This fall, voters in British Columbia, Manitoba, Northwest Territories, Ontario, Prince Edward Island and the Yukon are all set to mark ballots in municipal elections. Torontonians will presumably get to exercise their franchise, too, whenever that ugly snafu gets ironed out. A new research paper published in the Canadian Journal… ... more
    Macleans14 hours ago
  • How bad is smoking pot for my lungs?
    Any type of smoke, whether it’s cigarette, cannabis or campfire smoke, is bad for your lungs. Combustion, or burning, releases toxins and possible carcinogens, according to the American Lung Association. These are harmful to your lungs regardless of what you’re smoking, and are also harmful in the form of second-hand… ... more
    Macleans19 hours ago
  • In the heart of America, Trump is the only politician they k...
    It was sunny and raining in Gratz, Kentucky when the tire pressure light came on. The rental car, a miniature four-door Korean, already stank like a drowning ashtray and it guzzled gasoline like sweet tea and on the back roads—where the yellow signs warned BREAK IN PAVEMENT every couple of… ... more
    Macleans20 hours ago
  • Hold the constitutional crisis, we have a plowing match to r...
    On this much Doug Ford and Andrea Horwath agree—at least when stumping for rural voters: Toronto is a bubble. “Don’t get me wrong, I love Toronto,” Ford told attendees at the 101st annual International Plowing Match and Rural Expo. “But I call it the bubble. You have to get out… ... more
    Macleans1 day ago
  • What about Halifax?
    Dalhousie “The Dal Student Union runs plenty of events and initiatives for students. There are also many faculty and society (a.k.a. club) events. Most nights there’s at least one thing going on, from workshops to guest lectures and film screenings. Guest lectures may sound boring, but the speakers are always… ... more
    Macleans1 day ago
  • How will marijuana legalization change the U.S. border for C...
    This will cause a lot of trouble, to say the least. Crossing the border has always been a tense experience. For the thousands of Canadians who will be joining the legalized cannabis industry, it’s going to become even more harrowing. Even though cannabis has been legalized for recreational or medical… ... more
    Macleans1 day ago
  • Justin Trudeau on fighting populism, pushing a carbon tax, g...
    The return of Parliament from summer break on Monday was not a banner day for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. The headline news was the defection of one of his MPs, Leona Alleslev, who crossed the floor to join Andrew Scheer’s Conservative Party. It was an ominous start to the session… ... more
    Macleans1 day ago
  • Québécois music isn’t marginalized—it’s English Cana...
    The best Canadian-born performer going right now isn’t playing at Wembley Stadium or Madison Square Gardens, nor at Tokyo’s Nippon Budokan or Toronto’s Rogers Centre. He’s playing at places like L’Agora des Arts, a steepled brick building built in 1931 to serve as the first church in the Quebec mining… ... more
    Macleans1 day ago
  • Does the world still need Michael Moore?
    There was a time not too long ago when Michael Moore was, with the ostensible exception of then-at-large Osama Bin Laden, practically America’s most wanted man. The release of Moore’s blockbuster anti-Bush documentary Fahrenheit 9/11 in 2004 kicked off a widespread cultural panic. The nonprofit military charity Move Forward, which raises funds… ... more
    Macleans2 days ago
  • The best moments from Justin Trudeau’s conversation with M...
    Macleans2 days ago
  • ‘I am mine’: This is what Alzheimer’s is like at 41
    Robin Giles is waiting at the entrance of her London, Ont., apartment building when the little white bus pulls up at the curb. The door to the lift swings open to reveal her husband, Joël Aubin, sitting in his wheelchair, grinning broadly at her. His arms undulate through what looks… ... more
    Macleans2 days ago
  • Behind the scenes at Maclean’s Live with Justin Trudeau
    Justin Trudeau spoke with Paul Wells about everything from Donald Trump to the future of the Me Too movement at a Maclean’s Live event on September 17. Photographer Blair Gable spent the evening following Canada’s Prime Minister around the National Arts Centre in Ottawa. Here are a few of the… ... more
    Macleans2 days ago
  • Justin Trudeau on a raft of rising economic tensions between...
    As he prepares for a meeting with the premiers later this fall on economic issues, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in an hourlong Maclean’s Live interview that he’ll be pressing for what he called the “easy-win scenario” of bringing down trade barriers among provinces. READ MORE: Paul Wells interviews Justin… ... more
    Macleans2 days ago
  • Justin Trudeau on populism, the trouble with grand gestures ...
    In a world roiled by Trumps and Fords, polarized electorates and often-toxic public discourse, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meditated on the nature of democracy and the reasons for its seeming fragility at the moment, in an interview on Monday. Trudeau sat down for an hour-long interview with senior writer Paul… ... more
    Macleans2 days ago
  • On the economy, is it Trudeau’s sunny ways or Singh’s ra...
    Andrew Scheer is leader of the Official Opposition. He’s supposed to be focused on opposing the incumbent Liberal government. And working to replace it. But he has other problems. Maxime Bernier problems. You’d assume the Bernier split from the Conservative Party would put Prime Minister Trudeau in the clear. And… ... more
    Macleans2 days ago
  • MP Leona Alleslev on why she crossed the floor from the Libe...
    On Sept. 17, Leona Alleslev—the Liberal member of Parliament elected in the riding of Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill in 2015, and the former parliamentary secretary to the minister of public services and procurement—jolted affairs on Parliament’s first day back after the summer break by crossing the floor from the governing Liberals to… ... more
    Macleans2 days ago
  • What are the mental health risks of marijuana use?
    There are correlations between cannabis use and mental health issues, but studies have yet to show causation. The more provable consensus is that people who are already at risk of mental health issues are more likely to suffer adverse effects from cannabis use. Though cannabis is not a physically addictive… ... more
    Macleans2 days ago
  • The guilt and anguish of looking after elderly parents
    In November 2008, Elizabeth Hay, author of the Giller Prize-winning novel Late Nights on Air (2007), received the phone call that would upend her life—and not hers alone, but those of her 88-year-old parents, Jean and Gordon, her older brothers Stu and Al, and her younger sister, Jeannie. A visiting… ... more
    Macleans2 days ago
  • Dear Canadian voters: it’s time to get in the game
    Remember the 78-day 2015 federal election campaign, and how it was the longest in Canada since 1872? Well, voters: it’s time to get back into game shape. The next election might be a year away, but it’s already time to get off the sidelines and into the arena. Most voters… ... more
    Macleans3 days ago
  • The 2018 Giller Prize longlist has something for absolutely ...
    It’s prize season again, kicked off—as always—by the $100,000 Scotiabank Giller long list. As is becoming the award’s habit, the 12-name long list covers the national literary scene, and in no way tips the jury’s hand as to the sort of book it really likes. This year’s jury—Canadian writer and… ... more
    Macleans3 days ago
  • Why understanding the biology of our minds could cure autism...
    Dr. Eric Kandel is a distinguished psychiatrist, a pioneering neurological researcher, winner of the Nobel Prize in medicine, and, at 88, one of the last of his kind. Born into Vienna’s flourishing Jewish community, in 1939 Kandel fled the Nazi-occupied city, the home of Sigmund Freud and the birthplace of… ... more
    Macleans3 days ago
  • Woman accusing Trump Supreme Court nominee of sexual assault...
    WASHINGTON—U.S. President Donald Trump’s nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court was thrust into turmoil Sunday after the woman accusing him of high school-era sexual assault told her story publicly for the first time. Democrats immediately called for a delay in a key committee vote set for this later… ... more
    Macleans3 days ago
  • Election 2019: The battle lines are already drawn
    The ways in which politicians signal which issues they plan to run on are pretty much tried and true. Deliver a speech, release a platform document, coin a slogan. So credit Andrew Scheer for mixing it up a little. In a late-summer visit to Danforth Avenue, the traditional hub of… ... more
    Macleans4 days ago
  • Jian Ghomeshi’s #MeToo moment: It’s all about him
    There’s much to be said about the venerable New York Review of Books  publishing Jian Ghomeshi’s bad essay “Reflections from a Hashtag.” But first, full marks to the art director who chose to illustrate it with Edvard Munch’s “Evening, Melancholy I” depicting a brooding man at sunset. What better accompaniment to… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • Chretien, Romanow and McMurtry attack Ford’s use of the no...
    Former prime minister Jean Chretien, former Saskatchewan premier Roy Romanow and former Ontario attorney general Roy McMurtry—the three people who negotiated the addition of the notwithstanding clause in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in 1981—released a statement today condemning Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s use of the provision. Ford this… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • Will legalization make Canada a global dope destination?
    The growth potential for this type of destination tourism, especially with Americans, is huge, says Trina Fraser, partner and head of the CannaLaw group at Ottawa-based Brazeau Seller Law. Fraser sees a bright future for pot-friendly hotels and B & Bs, curated tours and private chef experiences. “If you’re close… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • Not so rare: The fight for rare disease treatment
    Rare diseases are by definition uncommon. But, collectively, rare diseases like Gaucher, Pompe, Fabry, and MPS (mucopolysaccharidosis) affect millions of Canadians. Many of these diseases can be very serious and even life-threatening, and yet, even when an effective… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • Rosie’s journey
    Rosie Sherman photographed at her home studio in Thornhill, ON. (Credit: Max Rosenstein) At first, the symptoms didn’t seem like anything to worry about. Rosie Sherman was leading an active life and showed no signs of sickness, but there was something strange going on. Rosie was 54 and while most… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • What is Maxime Bernier and his People’s Party selling?
    There’s a lot about Maxime Bernier’s new People’s Party of Canada that’s hard to take seriously, starting with that name. Still, the Quebec MP’s news conference today to launch the thing offered moments of real interest for anyone trying to sort out what’s happening these days on the right side… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • It would be irresponsible if Ontario didn’t postpone Toron...
    Angela Wright is a writer and political analyst. She previously worked as a political staffer at Queen’s Park and served as President of an Ontario PC riding association. She holds a master’s in history from the University of Iowa. The political climate in Toronto right now can only be described… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • The path to a one-term Doug Ford
    Doug Ford faced his first test this week, and although we won’t see his report card for a long time, there is no reason to think he did any better than he did in his unsuccessful academic career. Ford is a bull in a china shop, a disruptive Yosemite Sam… ... more
    Macleans5 days ago
  • A dispatch from the future: Doug Ford’s new civics curricu...
    In August, Ontario Premier Doug Ford announced that not only would the Ontario PC government follow through on his campaign promise to consult widely with folks before introducing a new sex-education curriculum, he’s open to reactionary and ill-informed input on many other aspects of children’s education, as well. Standardized testing… ... more
    Macleans6 days ago
  • What if the Toronto-Waterloo corridor really becomes the nex...
    Given Uber’s new experiments in the world of driverless cars, it seems only appropriate that Dara Khosrowshahi, the ride-hailing tech company’s CEO, would suggest that the company’s decision to invest and expand in Canada was self-driven. “For us, it was much more about talent than any business incentive. We’re on the… ... more
    Macleans6 days ago
  • Legally speaking, how far can Doug Ford go?
    Here’s a sense of how chaotic things have gotten at Toronto City Hall: one councillor asked the city’s lawyer on Thursday what would happen if they all simply quit in protest, en masse. Who would run the city then? The answer: the province would step in. Councillors are loath to see that… ... more
    Macleans6 days ago
  • Why liberal democracies could devolve into ‘digital dictat...
    Yuval Noah Harari is modest about his accomplishments—“I tell people what I’ve learned in my first year doing a BA degree in history,” he says—but the Israeli historian is certainly ambitious in his aims. He has sold more than eight million copies of his breakthrough bestseller, Sapiens: A Brief History… ... more
    Macleans7 days ago
  • With its patchwork of half-baked, absurd laws, Canada isn’...
    Bobby Kennedy spent much of his time with lawyers and in court during the summer that was supposed to usher in Canada’s era of legal marijuana. In mid-July, the City of Kelowna had ordered him to shut down the display counter of his downtown skateboard shop, BKRY, where since winter… ... more
    Macleans7 days ago
  • All the green, leafy, pun-filled names of the pot stores com...
    If you think cannabis legalization has brought out the worst in pun-loving headline writers, wait’ll you see the store name ideas. When recreational cannabis becomes legal on Oct. 17, nowhere will the streets bristle with change more than in Alberta. The free-enterprise and oil-loving province has been by far the… ... more
    Macleans7 days ago
  • Lest we forget: Presenting our Remembrance Day special comme...
    To mark the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War, Maclean’s is printing more than 66,000 commemorative issues, each bearing the name of a Canadian who died in the conflict. Featuring a definitive telling of the final days of the war by renowned historian J.L. Granatstein, along… ... more
    Macleans7 days ago
  • Calgary’s ‘May As Well’ Olympic bid—modest ambition ...
    In November, Calgarians will vote on whether they want to hold the Winter Olympics, like the city did in 1988. The population was 657,000 at the time; since then, it’s unbelievably doubled. The boosters pushing Calgary towards a “yes” on the plebiscite insist they aren’t merely trying to relive past… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • What happens if alcohol and marijuana mix?
    Health experts warn that mixing alcohol and pot can be dangerous, particularly if the marijuana is smoked or consumed first. Marijuana has anti-nausea properties, which are beneficial for cancer patients, but not great if those same properties are preventing someone who has downed too many drinks from vomiting. It’s best… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Brian Mulroney talks NAFTA as only he can
    Brian Mulroney’s words have a way of hanging in the air, and not just because that bass-baritone resonates down through the foundations of buildings to bedrock. So, with the NAFTA negotiations in Washington temporarily halted, and Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland declaring that she needs to brief Prime Minister Justin… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • How Canada’s growing anti-abortion movement plans to swing...
    When Doug Ford, newly minted as leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario, took the stage at the party’s leadership convention last March, he conspicuously thanked one person standing behind him: Tanya Granic Allen, an outspoken social conservative and leadership hopeful. Ford spoke of his intent “to return our… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • The downright abomination of stunt marriage proposals
    A few years ago when I was writing for Sportsnet magazine, this video made the rounds at the office. You might not expect a bunch of desk-jocks to swoon over a grand romantic gesture, but you would be wrong. My colleagues adored it: the Disney-parade spectacle, the unfolding surprise, the crescendo… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • What’s the point of a picket line? To stop scabs.
    It’s provoked one of those preposterous outpourings of social media outrage that roil and churn public debates nowadays, and the first odd thing about it is that it’s only a 57-second video, with no narration. There’s just a running line of explanatory text and scrolling photographs of a few people,… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • What are sativa, indica, THC and CBD?
    Here are 10 key terms every budding consumer should know about marijuana—sorry, cannabis. The two words refer to the same plant, though “marijuana”—which is Mexican Spanish in origin—became the U.S. government’s preferred term in the 1930s, when it wanted to scapegoat Latinos for the newly forbidden narcotic. Forms Flower Marijuana… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • On the case of Erin Weir, Jagmeet Singh has done everything ...
    It’s always easy to demand the release of a report when you know it never can happen. You can sound like a victimized soul who just wants the truth to come out. But you never have to worry it will. That advantage is being used by Saskatchewan MP Erin Weir,… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Adventures in better government with Doug Ford
    I’m with Emmett Macfarlane, basically: Justice Edward Belobaba’s ruling invalidating Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s law to reduce the number of Toronto city councillors from 47 to 25 is based on shaky constitutional reasoning at best. But the Ontario Conservatives saying “So of course the notwithstanding clause is the logical recourse”… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Why Doug Ford went straight to the ‘nuclear option’ on T...
    Few Ontarians would have predicted this becoming Doug Ford’s signature piece of legislation: a provincial bill designed to cut the size of Toronto city council in half. Not, at least, until Monday when—mere hours after a judge ruled Bill 5 unconstitutional and ordered the upcoming Toronto election to go forward… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Doug Ford’s law to slash Toronto council is unfair—but t...
    Emmett Macfarlane is an associate professor of political science at the University of Waterloo and author of Governing from the Bench: The Supreme Court of Canada and the Judicial Role (UBC Press, 2013). To call Ontario’s Bill 5 unfair would probably be an understatement. But saying so about the Ontario Progressive Conservative… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Don’t kill supply management for Trump, kill it for us
    Canada’s trade negotiators are in Washington working hard to save NAFTA. But, faced with an increasingly embattled Trump administration, a possible Mexican side deal, and renewed demands we sacrifice the supply management system, the odds do not appear to be in their favour. Not being a man for details, the… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Syria’s once-promising revolution lurches toward a horrifi...
    A “perfect storm” of chaos and atrocity is the way UN Syrian envoy Staffan de Mistura describes what he sees hovering over at least three million Syrian civilians bottled up in the killing zone of Idlib, the last major pocket of resistance to Bashar Assad’s criminal regime in Damascus. “Syria… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Are we there yet?!
    Driving vacations are the stuff of family lore – you and your kids will remember your road trip for years to come. But driving the family across country or south for a winter break also comes with a few challenges. Follow our survival strategies and smart advice to make… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • The trauma of high school gym class
    Let’s share high school gym class memories. I’ll go first. Early 1980s. Confederation High School, suburban Ottawa. The gymnastics unit. As a middle-aged adult who has still never successfully completed a somersault, high school gymnastics engendered a particularly virulent form of dread in my teenaged self. With a tumbling routine… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • The end of what’s left of the Canadian Alliance
    Mexicans often speak of their political system as surreal, and among its more surreal aspects in recent years is a political party calling itself Nueva Alianza (New Alliance,) which stole its name and logo from the defunct Canadian Alliance. Like its Canadian namesake, Nueva Alianza is about to go defunct, having failed to win enough… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Will criminal records for pot convictions be expunged after ...
    You’re out of luck—at least for now. In January, the Trudeau government squashed hopes for exploring amnesty on possession charges until after the federal government’s legalization framework is instituted. A few months later, an NDP motion to pardon all cannabis offences that won’t be against the law post-legalization failed when… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Gary Shteyngart on why the free world is going to undemocrat...
    Garry Shteyngart, author of Absurdistan and the prescient Super Sad True Love Story, is one of America’s funniest novelists. In his new book, Lake Success, Shteyngart’s hilarity hitches the reader with zeitgeist-y introspection and brilliant pathos. It is 2016, and his complex protagonist is Barry Cohen, a super-rich Republican hedgie, on… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • Why the court ruled against Doug Ford’s attempt to slash T...
    On Sept. 10, Justice Edward P. Belobaba denied the province’s attempt to cut Toronto’s city council almost in half. Doug Ford’s Progressive Conservatives had just recently passed Bill 5, which reduced council from 47 to 25 seats just as the fall municipal campaign began in earnest. Read the full decision below.… ... more
    Macleans1 week ago
  • What happens after the affair—when you have kids
    Rachel* will never forget the night she saw the email that, she says, “I wasn’t supposed to see.” It was an evening like so many others in her marriage. She’d dozed off when putting the kids, then six and 10, to bed, while her husband, Marcus, worked late at his… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • When it comes to NAFTA, deadlines are meaningless
    The re-negotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has proceeded with the punctuality and scenery of Ottawa’s Macdonald–Cartier International Airport on a particularly snowy winter day: Cascading delays, missed connections, numerous cancellations, and rushing politicians and staffers as far as the eye can see. Since the timetable for the… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • What will Winnipeg do with Canada’s most famous intersecti...
    To cross one of the most famous intersections in the nation, pedestrians in Winnipeg must, like prairie dogs, head underground. Since 1979, Portage and Main has been closed to humans on foot (or bike or wheelchair) by waist-high concrete barriers and signage warning them off from even thinking about hustling… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • It’s time to leverage Canada’s energy advantage into a g...
    Shuvaloy Majumdar is the Munk senior fellow for foreign policy at the Macdonald Laurier Institute, and a former policy director to Canadian foreign ministers.  For many, Canada’s role in geopolitics and world affairs is often centred on what we can do with our intellectual and cultural talents. We see ourselves as a country best suited to act… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • The reports of the death of Canada’s small towns have been...
    Vicki-May Hamm is the president of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and the mayor of Magog, Que. Small towns and rural communities are continually adapting to familiar challenges—aging populations, the closure of a major local employer, or limited access to communications infrastructure. Yet so many of these communities have not… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • How long after smoking marijuana should I wait to drive?
    Nobody knows. At the very least, you should wait two hours after one hit, if not four hours or more—and that’s highly dependent on the THC level of the joint. You should wait even longer after you gobble an edible. The easy answer is: don’t toke and drive. Especially in… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • In Fredericton, a mourning city’s hour of truce
    Fredericton Police badge is seen during a police memorial parade in Ottawa Sunday September 26, 2010. (The Canadian Press Images/Francis Vachon) On Aug. 18, while the eyes of the nation were trained on the regimental funeral procession for two fallen Fredericton police officers, an extended family of motorcyclists had also… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • How Ottawa created the world’s second-largest animation fe...
    Chris Robinson, artistic director of the Ottawa International Animation Festival, knows the question you’re going to ask­—even if you phrase it very politely—because it’s the question everyone asks: Ottawa? Really? How did Ottawa end up with the second-largest animation festival in the world? Best as he can explain it, in… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • Why ‘lodestar’ will forever be with us
    “You hold me as the lodestar holds the iron: I cannot but cling to you,” wrote George Bernard Shaw in his best faux Shakespeare in The Dark Lady of the Sonnets. Perhaps so, but Mike Pence must be trying to scrape off his lodestar off like a wad of gum… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • So you want to betray your boss in the New York Times? Here...
    Scott Reid is a principal with Feschuk.Reid, a former director of communications to prime minister Paul Martin, and a sneaky puke. By now, you’ve probably read the anonymous New York Times op-ed penned by some brave bastard waging a rebel resistance from within Trump’s oval bunker. Perhaps you’ve had time to debate… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
  • The de facto veto on building pipelines in Canada
    Amid the confusion over last week’s Trans Mountain court ruling, let’s begin with what we know for sure about the federal government’s “duty to consult” with Indigenous groups. “This process does not give Aboriginal groups a veto over what can be done,” states the 2004 Supreme Court ruling that originally… ... more
    Macleans2 weeks ago
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